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Supreme Court Law Review, 2nd Series, Volume 89

This Year-In-Review volume comprises papers reviewing groundbreaking Supreme Court of Canada's 2017-2018 decisions in criminal law, the law of evidence, and recent developments in the legal profession, along with case comments and special essays.
Publication Language: English
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$225.00
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Published:
ISBN/ISSN: 9780433500933

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SCLR Year-In-Review Volume

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This Year-In-Review volume comprises papers reviewing groundbreaking Supreme Court of Canada's 2017-2018 decisions in criminal law, the law of evidence, and recent developments in the legal profession, along with case comments and special essays.

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Table of contents

Articles
1. Richard Litkowski and Jessica Zita – Developments in Criminal Law – Criminal Procedure: 2017-2018 Term
2. Ian Smith – Developments in Substantive Criminal Law: 2017-2018 Term
3. Anisah Hassan & Carlos Sayao – Developments in the Law of Evidence: The 2017-2018 Term
4. Matthew Estabrooks – Annual Report on Applications for Leave to Appeal to the Supreme Court of Canada: 2017-2018

Case Comments
5. Geoff Hall – Can you Rely on the Livent Undertaking?: An Analysis of the Implications of Deloitte & Touche v. Livent
6. Derek Ross – ‘Intolerant and Illiberal’? Trinity Western University and its Implications for Charter Jurisprudence
7. Anisah Hassan – Seismic Shift or Minor Modification: Interpreting the Supreme Court's Decision in Teva Canada Ltd. v. TD Canada Trust
8. Susan Chapman – Stewart v. Elk Valley Coal Corp. and British Columbia Human Rights Tribunal v. Schrenk: The Continuing Lack of Analytical Coherence in Cases of Discrimination in Employment
9. Régine Tremblay – Thoughts on the Hague Convention on the Civil Aspects of International Child Abduction, Habitual Residence and the Supreme Court’s decision in Office of the Children’s Lawyer v. Balev

Special Essay
10. Barbara Billingsley – Reasonable and Expected? The Evolution of the Doctrine of Reasonable Expectations as a Principle of Insurance Contract Interpretation in Supreme Court Jurisprudence